Last edited by Moogunos
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Archaeological investigations into the English Civil War defences of London found in the catalog.

Archaeological investigations into the English Civil War defences of London

David Flintham

Archaeological investigations into the English Civil War defences of London

by David Flintham

  • 205 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementDavid Flintham.
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 233-235 :
Number of Pages235
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22360281M

  Very interesting, but needs updating as investigation has continued with new information on how Hunley was sunk. Got to give a lot of credit to those who served and built Hunley. This comes from New London, CT where we know about submarines and how difficult their task was during the Civil War. These guys were heros for s: Drawing its numerous examples from Britain and beyond, Archaeological Investigation explores the procedures used in field archaeology travelling over the whole process from discovery to publication. Divided into four parts, it argues for a set of principles in part one, describes work in the field in part two and how to write up in part s: 6.

The lines of communication: the Civil War defences of London / Victor Smith and Peter Kelsey "This proud unthankefull city": a cavalier view of London in the Civil War / Ian Roy ; The economic and social impact of the Civil War upon London / Stephen Porter ; Political funerals during the English Revolution / Ian Gentles.   A. J. P. Taylor was one of the most acclaimed and uncompromising historians of the twentieth century. In this clear, lively and now-classic account of the First World War, he tells the story of the conflict from the German advance in the West, through the Marne, Gallipoli, the Balkans and the War at Sea to the offensives of and the state of Europe after the s:

Many more sheltered fairly safely at home or at work. There is detailed information about all aspects of sheltering in London in Terence O'Brien's Civil Defence. PRO CAB /31 contains some of the notes on shelters used in O'Brien's published book. Hillfort defences of Southern Britain by Michael Avery: Roman Brooches from North Britain (British Archaeological Reports (BAR) British) by Margaret E. Snape: Discovery by design: the identification of secular élite settlements in western Britain A.D. by Kenneth Rainsbury Dark:


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Archaeological investigations into the English Civil War defences of London by David Flintham Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ECW defences of London. ‘The Topography of the Lines of the Communication - Mapping the Civil War Defences of London’ in London Topographical Society Newsletter, 45, (London Topographical Society, ) ‘Archaeological investigations into the English Civil War Defences of London’ in London Archaeologist, 8, (London Archaeologist, ).

Fear that the king and his army were marching on London in October sent the capital scrambling to fortify start of November saw the city digging defensive positions, with more forts, ramparts and ditches completing the ring of defences. During –3 London, Westminster and Southwark were given the protection of the most extensive defensive circuit built by either side during the English Civil War Cited by: 1.

Others were kept in service and used during the English Civil War, the Anglo-Dutch Wars, the Napoleonic Wars and, upgraded with more modern artillery and defences, throughout the 19th century. Byhowever, developments in guns and armour had made most of the Device Forts that remained in service simply too small to be practical in modern.

'Look to your walls': towns in the civil war Roofless bulwarks: castles in the civil war Garrisons and strongpoints: the defence of the country house Fields of conflict, sites of battle Batteries, bridges and burials: other civil war sites and evidence Economies of war: the material culture of the civil war: Series.

The English Civil War: A Military History Peter Gaunt. out of 5 stars Paperback. £ 'The Civil War in London' provides a robust introductory history of London during the middle years of the seventeenth century, and is a welcome addition. out of 5 stars An excellent insight into the City of London in the s: 3.

Sandgate Castle is an artillery fort originally constructed by Henry VIII in Sandgate in Kent, between and It formed part of the King's Device programme to protect England against invasion from France and the Holy Roman Empire, and defended vulnerable point along the comprised a central stone keep, with three towers and a gatehouse.

The English Civil War represents several sets of conflicts between King Charles the I and his Cavaliers (also known as the Royalists) versus Oliver Cromwell and the Parliamentarians (also known as the Roundheads). All in all, the conflicts lasted from until the last of Charles’ supporters were defeated in Raging across England, the [ ].

Remains of a fortified manor house. Built by Henry de Percy in the early 14th century, it was further expanded later in the 14th and 15th centuries to the layout that exists today.

The castle was damaged during the Wars of the Roses, but was later rebuilt in Suffering further damage during the English Civil War ofit lapsed into.

Books on Shelves in Berkely House, by Author H-Z H HACKETT, General Sir John, ed. Warfare in the ancient world. Guild Publishing, MISC HAGEN, Anders. Viking ship finds.

University of Oldsaksamling, PAM HAGEN, Rose-Marie & HAGEN, Rainer. Egypt: people, gods, pharaohs. Taschen, EGY HALL, Richard A. Book of Viking Age York. Batsford/English. The English Civil War (–) was a series of civil wars and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") principally over the manner of England's governance and part of the wider Wars of the Three first (–) and second (–) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of.

The Tower was orientated with its strongest and most impressive defences overlooking Saxon London, which archaeologist Alan Vince suggests was deliberate.

It would have visually dominated the surrounding area and stood out to traffic on the River Thames. The castle is made up of three "wards", or innermost ward contains the White Tower and is the.

Millions of Americans seek out that kind of visceral connection at Civil War sites annually, and the next few years are the time to visit as.

The archaeological, historical and topographical context of malmesbury’s defences has recently been described in detail in a report on the archaeological investigations of on the line of the town wall at nun’s Walk, to the south of the present site (longman ; locations shown on figure 1).

The Phinney Site: An Archaeological Investigation of a Revolutionary War Site During the mid's, Brent Phinney, owner of a sawmill and steel fabrication shop in Brewer, Maine, discovered the remains of a wooden shipwreck in shallow water just off the eastern shoreline of the Penobscot River. New archaeological techniques, however, are beginning to provide more scientific explanations of how 17 th century warfare was fought.

In this guest post Amanda Wynne explains how laser scanning technology is helping us to more accurately interpret English Civil War sieges - and the benefits the results may have for other fields.

“Good old English damp,” Watson says, laughing. historians regard as one of the world’s first formal archaeological investigations. his book Illustrations of Roman London was the.

For 20 years, he has been investigating London’s defences during the English Civil Wars and is now considered to be the expert on London’s Civil War fortifications. His research has culminated in two books - London in the Civil War () and The English Civil War Defences of London () - and numerous articles.

The excavations and finds covered here do examine how familiar facets of war—tactics, weapons, technology, and intelligence—can be seen in the archaeological record. There are submerged tanks, downed airplanes, a cryptological machine, and a forgotten remnant of the nuclear weapons the United States used on Japan, which both helped end the.

As has previously been highlighted, any cultural study of the history of excavation is presented with the watershed year of ; when government funds were first used to pay for archaeological excavations on sites due to be destroyed by military defence works in the build-up to the Second World War.

32 32 Butcher and Garwood. 9; Everill. The Lines of Communication: The Civil War Defences of London / Victor Smith and Peter Kelsey 'This Proud Unthankfull City': A Cavalier View of London in the Civil War / Ian Roy The Economic and Social Impact of the Civil War upon London / Stephen Porter Political Funerals during the English Revolution / Ian Gentles.

Responsibility.The English Civil War Defences of London, by David Flintham Booklet published by Stuart Press, 48 pages. A5 size booklet (NX1) Between the Autumn of and the early-Summer ofa massive circuit of earthworks was thrown up around London.of a post-Civil War battlefield archaeological pattern or mode l that allows a more in-depth understanding of combat behavior (Fox and Scottpp.

92–; Scott et al.p. ).